Unbound Productions

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Torque

Synopsis
Torque, written by Rebecca Hill, is a play partly in sign-language about a relationship between a deaf man and a hearing woman. It begins with their first meeting and follows them as they discover how to communicate, through the highs and lows of their relationship, to their final breakup and the consequences this unleashes. It is about communication in relationships, equality regardless of disability, and what we are willing to sacrifice for love.

rehersal511120173

Bush Theatre
As a winner of the Bush Theatre’s Bush Bounce 2 brief via IdeasTap.com, we had a month to write and stage short development period in 20 minute exploration of the idea. It was then performed in the Bush Theatre’s library, in a programme of comedy, art and performance installations. We experimented with the idea of a character speaking entirely in Sign Language with no translation for a hearing audience and, with feedback from our audience, were compelled to continue developing the play. Writer - Rebecca Hill Director - Bradley Leech Man - Dwane Walcott Woman - Kate Craggs

See the blog for the Bush Theatre process here

Shortlisted by Masterclass: Pitch Your Play
In 2013, Torque was in the final 6 to receive a rehearsed reading on the Theatre Royal Haymarket’s stage.

Oval House
In late 2013, Torque was a recipient of Ovalhouse’s Arts Manifesto: A future for the arts award. Introduced by Rebecca, extracts were featured in a night exploring theatre’s future, to a panel including Matt Trueman, Sabrina Mahfouz and Nancy Groves. Writer - Rebecca Hill Director - Charlotte Lewis Man - David Sands Woman - Hannah Morrish

Future
We love this play and will continue to develop and fight for it, so all we can say is - watch this space!

NOTE! This site uses cookies and similar technologies.

By continuing without change to your browser settings, you accept this site's use of cookies. Learn more

I understand

What are Cookies?

Cookies are pieces of data, normally stored in text files, that websites place on visitors' computers to store a range of information, usually specific to that visitor - or rather the device they are using to view the site - like the browser or mobile phone.

They were created to overcome a limitation in web technology. Web pages are 'stateless' - which means that they have no memory, and cannot easily pass information between each other. So cookies provide a kind of memory for web pages.

Cookies allow you to login on one page, then move around to other pages and stay logged in. They allow you to set preferences for the display of a page, and for these to be remembered the next time you return to it.

Cookies can also be used to watch the pages you visit between sites, which allows advertisers to build up a picture of your interests. Then when you land on a site that shows one of their adverts - they can tailor it to those interests. This is known as 'behavioural advertising'.

Almost all websites use cookies in some way or another, and every page you visit in those sites writes cookies to your computer and receives them back from it.

Cookies are incredibly useful – they allow modern websites to work the way people have come to expect – with every increasing levels of personalisation and rich interactive functionality.

However, they can also be used to manipulate your web experience in ways you might not expect, or like. It could be to your benefit, or the benefit of someone else – even a business or organisation that you have never had any direct contact with, or perhaps heard of.

It is impossible to tell just by looking at them, whether particular cookies are benefitting you or another party. You have to rely on the website you are visiting to tell you how it uses cookies.

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